Patients

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“I was prepared to die,” Brenda said. After seven months of chemotherapy, radiation, and a mastectomy, Brenda Vincentz-Smithhad defeated breast cancer, but doctors had given her a new diagnosis: brain metastases. Cancer cells from Brenda’s breast had traveled to her brain, attaching to her healthy brain tissue as three separate tumors. To Brenda, brain tumors sounded like the end of the road. To her doctors, they looked more like a pothole, an obstacle that, with the right treatment, Brenda could potentially overcome.

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As a professional classical musician, Kristen Linfante’s career has always posed challenges. But she never imagined one of those challenges would stem from a debilitating nervous system disorder. Kristen suffers from dysautonomia, estimated to affect 70 million people around the world.

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Emily was suffering up to 200 seizures a day until an experimental medical device – compared to a pacemaker for the brain – gave her much needed relief. Now, the device is FDA approved to dramatically reduce epileptic seizures, in some patients up to 90 percent. Hear Emily’s story and learn how innovative medical technology is improving her quality of life.

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October 29, 2018

Open-heart surgery poses a difficult road to recovery. There are risks of chest wound infection, pneumonia, and blood clotting, all of which are compounded by age and more common in patients who have had open-heart surgery before. So when Herb Thau, at age 84, learned he might need a second open-heart surgery, he felt scared and uncertain.

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When professional violinist Roger Frish noticed a tiny but uncontrollable shake in his bow hand, he was devastated. Fortunately, doctors pinpointed a unique medtech solution.

Everyone’s experienced it: the feeling you get after running very fast. Your heart rate is up, you are short of breath and can feel dizzy or faint. For most people, the feeling goes away after a few moments of rest. But for Brandon Cobia, this was not the case. The Alabama resident and father of two had been living for months with a resting heart rate of 170-180, which is similar to the heart rate of someone who has just completed a 26.2 mile marathon. Within a six-month period, he endured several procedures to correct his condition, called atrial tachycardia, which is a type of arrhythmia known as a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT).

Medical Technology Saves and Improves Lives

Medical technology is used at different points along the disease continuum and provides earlier diagnosis, improved surgical methods, and innovations in disease management.

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She saw the potential to improve outcomes for her patients.

Dr. Korey Hood was working with pediatric diabetes patients when he noticed the classic symptoms of the disease in himself. Today, medical technology helps him confidently and effectively manage his treatment.

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